Whooping cough - Pertussis

Whooping cough <br>(Pertussis)

Whooping cough (also known as pertussis or "100-day cough") is an infection of the lungs and airways. Highly contagious, this respiratory disease can affect anyone, at any age and can be particularly severe among young infants and at-risk adults (for example, with asthma or COPD).

Since the introduction of its first whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine in the 1950s, Sanofi has continued to demonstrate its commitment by developing preventive vaccine solutions (25 different combined vaccines) that today can help protect against whooping cough from infants to the elderly.

Facts About Whooping Cough  
Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease that can occur at any age
At any age
Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease that can occur at any age. <sup>1-2</sup>
1 person with whooping cough can infect up to 17 other people
1 to 17
1 person with whooping cough can infect up to 17 other people. <sup>4</sup>
Whooping cough can lead to serious and potentially  life-threatening complications such as pneumonia
Whooping cough can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening complications such as pneumonia. <sup>2</sup>
Whooping cough remains one of the most prevalent vaccine preventable diseases today
Whooping cough remains one of the most prevalent vaccine preventable diseases today. <sup>4</sup>
Even when vaccinated, immunity to whooping cough eventually wears off
Even when vaccinated,
immunity to whooping cough eventually wears off. A booster dose is then needed to restore protection. <sup>5</sup>
Upshot #8 - Understanding Vaccination in Pregnancy

Upshot #8 - Understanding Vaccination in Pregnancy

Vulnerable populations: infants and asthmatic population
Early ymptoms of whooping cough are similar to those of a common cold

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Causes and transmission of whooping cough (pertussis).
    https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/causes-transmission.html Accessed February 22, 2022.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fast facts about whooping cough. https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/fast-facts.html Accessed February 22, 2022.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Signs and symptoms of whooping cough (pertussis). https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/about/signs-symptoms.html Accessed February 22, 2022.
  4. Kilgore PE, Salim AM, Zervos MJ, Schmitt HJ. Pertussis: Microbiology, Disease, Treatment, and Prevention. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2016;29:449-486.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4861987 Accessed February 22, 2022.
  5. Scherer A, Mc Lean A. Mathematical models of vaccination. Br Med Bull. 2002;62:187-199. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12176860 Accessed February 22, 2022.
  6. Buck PO, MeyersJL, Gordon L-D, et al. Economie burden of diagnosed pertussis among individuals with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA: an analysis of administrative daims. Epidemiol Infect. 2017;2109-2121. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28462763 Accessed February 22, 2022.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2019 Final Pertussis Surveillance Report. https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/downloads/pertuss-surv-report-2019-508.pdf Accessed February 22, 2022.